May

Result: (7)

Potentially dangerous parasite found in farmed fish from Vietnam

03.08.2017

NIFES scientists were surprised to find the parasite Chinese liver fluke in farmed Pangasius in Vietnam. At worst, the parasite can cause serious liver disease and cancer if the actual seafood is eaten raw, without prior freezing or properly heating.

Can pesticides end up in salmon?

30.05.2017

We are now seeing much less of the ‘old’ environmental contaminants like dioxins and DDT in farmed salmon, after plant ingredients replaced fish oil and meal in the feed. Is it possible, though, that we have created a new problem caused by pesticides from agriculture ending up as residues in fish feed?

Norwegian bivalve molluscs in good condition

24.05.2017

The annual monitoring showed that one in four flat oysters had cadmium levels above the maximum level, but that Norwegian bivalve molluscs are otherwise in good condition.

Why do more farmed salmon lose their sight in summer?

22.05.2017

Farmed salmon often lose their sight in summer as cataracts make their eyes opaque. This happens when the temperature rises, but exactly why it happens has not been known. Scientists at NIFES have now found out more about the link between sea temperature and blindness in salmon.

Dr. Fridtjof Nansen has started working

18.05.2017
Cruise leader Reidar Toresen reports that the new research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen is well under way on its very first cruise off North-West Africa.
 
– We left Casablanca in the evening 8 May and we are now working in the ocean between Morocco and The Canary Iles until 7 June, says Toresen. – During 2017 the goal is to cover the whole west coast of Africa, from Casablanca to Cape Town, he adds. 

Plan to merge the Institute of Marine Research and NIFES

12.05.2017

In its revised national budget, the Norwegian government proposes merging the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and NIFES – The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research.

Sufficient levels of marine fatty acids in fish deprived Nepal

04.05.2017

Bhaktapur is nearly 1,000 kilometres away from the nearest ocean. Nevertheless, the Nepalese have good levels of marine fatty acids in their blood. The reason for this is a mystery to scientists.