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News Archive

Search the news archives of NIFES and HI, respectively, to find news published before 2017.

Result: (40) Showing 1 - 30

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Developing technology to recognise cod and salmon

11.01.2018

The Institute of Marine Research and the Norwegian Computing Centre have received a NOK 15.5 million grant for the ICT project COGMAR. One key goal is to automate the interpretation of images from echo sounders, trawl cameras and other observation methods.

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Making demersal seines more precise

10.01.2018

Demersal seines are so effective that the haul can become unmanageable. It has also been difficult to avoid bycatches when using them. Since 2013, fisheries researchers at the Institute of Marine Research have been working to redesign this fishing gear.

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Lots of interest in the RV Kronprins Haakon

03.01.2018

On the 2nd of January 2018, large numbers of politicians and journalists accepted the invitation to take a guided tour of the research vessel Kronprins Haakon, which arrived in Bergen on the 30th of December 2017.

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A new era for Norwegian Polar research

02.01.2018

The new icebreaking research vessel Kronprins Haakon is amongst the most advanced in the world. Today it is being presented in Bergen.

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Why do eels in Norway choose to stay in salt water?

15.12.2017

Some eels migrate into fresh water, while others remain at sea, particularly in Northern Europe. The IMR has received funding to investigate why.

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Colder seawater reduces salmon mortality when delousing

11.12.2017

Bath treatment with hydrogen peroxide is an effective method to remove sea lice on farmed Atlantic salmon, but treatments can be associated with high mortalities. Findings from researchers at the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and the University of Melbourne have developed a new treatment concept that can reduce salmon mortality and improve welfare.

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Kelp to shield mussels from ocean acidification

04.12.2017

A joint Norwegian-Chinese project in Austevoll is investigating whether kelp farms in China can protect farmed mussels against increasing ocean acidification.

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Budget agreement ensures extra NOK 27 million for marine research

29.11.2017

– We are delighted that, taken in consideration Norway’s ambitious goals to expand our exploration on marine resources, this agreement strengthens us further as a management institute. The marine industries must be managed sustainably if we are to handle the desired growth in a good manner, says The Institute of Marine Research’s Managing Director Sissel Rogne.

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IMR and NIFES share the same homepage

29.11.2017

The Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES) now share the same homepage. This is due to the process of merging the two institutes. The formal date for the merge is the 1th of January 2018.

Have more answers about seafood and health

08.11.2017

Over the past four years, with a budget of NOK 70 million and around 45 planned scientific articles, researchers have endeavoured to find out what effect fish and seafood consumption have on our health. The Fish Intervention Studies project (FINS) is near completion and the results are starting to come in.

'Fresh' cod all year round with the right freezing and thawing method

03.11.2017

Controlled freezing and thawing of cod give consumers a product all year round that rivals fresh fish. A new research project shows that the way in which cod is frozen and thawed makes all the difference to the quality of the product.

National budget: NOK 11 million to study krill in Antarctic

12.10.2017

The Institute of Marine Research (IMR) has been allocated NOK 11 million for an expedition to study krill in Antarctica in winter 2018–2019, the Southern Hemisphere’s summer. The new icebreaker research vessel “Kronprins Haakon” will be used.

New dietary recommendations for salmon

06.10.2017

Some of the recommendations on vitamin and mineral supplements in the feed for Atlantic salmon must be changed. This happens because a shift from mainly marine ingredients to feeds where more than 70% comes from plants has changed the requirements. Implementation of this new knowledge is important for the growth and welfare of the salmon.

New dietary recommendations for salmon

06.10.2017

Some of the recommendations on vitamin and mineral supplements in the feed for Atlantic salmon must be changed. This happens because a shift from mainly marine ingredients to feeds where more than 70% comes from plants has changed the requirements. Implementation of this new knowledge is important for the growth and welfare of the salmon.

The Government has approved co-location in a new building

06.09.2017

Prime Minister Erna Solberg and Minister of Petroleum and Energy Terje Søviknes announced on Sunday that the Government has said yes to a new building for the purpose of co-locating the soon-to-be-merged Institute of Marine Research and NIFES, and the Directorate of Fisheries.

The Government has approved co-location in a new building

03.09.2017

Prime Minister Erna Solberg and Minister of Petroleum and Energy Terje Søviknes announced that the Government has said yes to a new building for the purpose of co-locating the soon-to-be-merged Institute of Marine Research and NIFES, and the Directorate of Fisheries.

Could kelp be the new potato?

25.08.2017

A nutritious vegetable grows along our shores that we barely use. Scientists now want to investigate whether kelp can make up a greater part of the European diet.

Salmon lice capable of developing tolerance to fresh and warm water treatment

18.08.2017

Genetic variations mean that different families of salmon lice have different tolerances to freshwater and warm water. Both treatments are used to delouse farmed fish. The findings suggest that salmon lice could eventually develop higher tolerance to the treatments, rendering them less effective.

Mould toxins can end up in fish feed

16.10.2017

So far, fish have been spared the problem of mycotoxins produced by mould, but the increase of plant ingredients in farmed fish feed has resulted in more such toxins in fish feed too. Many ‘new’ toxins have been discovered, and we know little about any consequences they may have for fish and people.

Went from too little to harmful levels of iodine

24.07.2017

The prevalence of goitre used to be high in the mountainous country of Nepal, and children were born with brain damage because of serious iodine deficiency. Now, Norwegian research shows, on the contrary, that many Nepalese people have a too high iodine intake. What happened?

Research Council of Norway provides funding for new robotic floats

26.06.2017

The Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry Monica Mæland visited the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen to pass on the good news. During her visit, she met one of the cylindrical, yellow “marine scientists” that will drift on the ocean currents.

Inspiring gathering with Strategic Advisory Board

16.06.2017

– This has been a great and inspiring experience. It’s been fantastic to have access to some of the world’s best researchers for three full days, says Sissel Rogne, the IMR’s Managing Director, who hosted the first meeting of its Strategic Advisory Board.

EU research and innovation Director-General visits the IMR

14.06.2017

Robert-Jan Smits, the Director-General of research and innovation in the EU, visits the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen wednesday.

Recommends reducing cod quota by 20%

13.06.2017

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) recommends that the cod quota in the Barents Sea next year does not exceed 712,000 tonnes. This is a reduction of 20% compared to this year’s quota.

“We are experiencing a natural decline in Atlantic cod stocks, which we need to take into consideration,” says the Research Director at the Institute of Marine Research, Geir Huse.

Norway receives praise for its ocean science

13.10.2017

Norway received the IOC prize for its ocean science knowledge and capacity. Director General of NIFES Ole Arve Misund accepted the prize on behalf of Norway during the UN Ocean Conference in New York this week.

Norwegian bivalve molluscs in good condition

24.05.2017

The annual monitoring showed that one in four flat oysters had cadmium levels above the maximum level, but that Norwegian bivalve molluscs are otherwise in good condition.

Why do more farmed salmon lose their sight in summer?

22.05.2017

Farmed salmon often lose their sight in summer as cataracts make their eyes opaque. This happens when the temperature rises, but exactly why it happens has not been known. Scientists at NIFES have now found out more about the link between sea temperature and blindness in salmon.

Dr. Fridtjof Nansen has started working

18.05.2017
Cruise leader Reidar Toresen reports that the new research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen is well under way on its very first cruise off North-West Africa.
 
– We left Casablanca in the evening 8 May and we are now working in the ocean between Morocco and The Canary Iles until 7 June, says Toresen. – During 2017 the goal is to cover the whole west coast of Africa, from Casablanca to Cape Town, he adds. 

Plan to merge the Institute of Marine Research and NIFES

12.05.2017

In its revised national budget, the Norwegian government proposes merging the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and NIFES – The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research.

Potentially dangerous parasite found in farmed fish from Vietnam

03.08.2017

NIFES scientists were surprised to find the parasite Chinese liver fluke in farmed Pangasius in Vietnam. At worst, the parasite can cause serious liver disease and cancer if the actual seafood is eaten raw, without prior freezing or properly heating.