Research from ocean to plate

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Developing technology to recognise cod and salmon

18.01.2018

The Institute of Marine Research and the Norwegian Computing Centre have received a NOK 15.5 million grant for the ICT project COGMAR. One key goal is to automate the interpretation of images from echo sounders, trawl cameras and other observation methods.

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Making demersal seines more precise

17.01.2018

Demersal seines are so effective that the haul can become unmanageable. It has also been difficult to avoid bycatches when using them. Since 2013, fisheries researchers at the Institute of Marine Research have been working to redesign this fishing gear.

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Lots of interest in the RV Kronprins Haakon

12.01.2018

On the 2nd of January 2018, large numbers of politicians and journalists accepted the invitation to take a guided tour of the research vessel Kronprins Haakon, which arrived in Bergen on the 30th of December 2017.

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A new era for Norwegian Polar research

02.01.2018

The new icebreaking research vessel Kronprins Haakon is amongst the most advanced in the world. Today it is being presented in Bergen.

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Why do eels in Norway choose to stay in salt water?

15.12.2017

Some eels migrate into fresh water, while others remain at sea, particularly in Northern Europe. The IMR has received funding to investigate why.

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Colder seawater reduces salmon mortality when delousing

11.12.2017

Bath treatment with hydrogen peroxide is an effective method to remove sea lice on farmed Atlantic salmon, but treatments can be associated with high mortalities. Findings from researchers at the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and the University of Melbourne have developed a new treatment concept that can reduce salmon mortality and improve welfare.

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Kelp to shield mussels from ocean acidification

04.12.2017

A joint Norwegian-Chinese project in Austevoll is investigating whether kelp farms in China can protect farmed mussels against increasing ocean acidification.

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Budget agreement ensures extra NOK 27 million for marine research

29.11.2017

– We are delighted that, taken in consideration Norway’s ambitious goals to expand our exploration on marine resources, this agreement strengthens us further as a management institute. The marine industries must be managed sustainably if we are to handle the desired growth in a good manner, says The Institute of Marine Research’s Managing Director Sissel Rogne.

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IMR and NIFES share the same homepage

29.11.2017

The Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES) now share the same homepage. This is due to the process of merging the two institutes. The formal date for the merge is the 1th of January 2018.

Have more answers about seafood and health

08.11.2017

Over the past four years, with a budget of NOK 70 million and around 45 planned scientific articles, researchers have endeavoured to find out what effect fish and seafood consumption have on our health. The Fish Intervention Studies project (FINS) is near completion and the results are starting to come in.

'Fresh' cod all year round with the right freezing and thawing method

03.11.2017

Controlled freezing and thawing of cod give consumers a product all year round that rivals fresh fish. A new research project shows that the way in which cod is frozen and thawed makes all the difference to the quality of the product.

National budget: NOK 11 million to study krill in Antarctic

12.10.2017

The Institute of Marine Research (IMR) has been allocated NOK 11 million for an expedition to study krill in Antarctica in winter 2018–2019, the Southern Hemisphere’s summer. The new icebreaker research vessel “Kronprins Haakon” will be used.

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About the Institute of Marine Research

The Institute of Marine Research (IMR) is one of the biggest research institute of its kind in Europe, with over 1,000 employees. Our main activities are research, advisory work and monitoring.

In January 2018, the IMR was merged with NIFES – The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research. The web pages was merged November 30 2017. The new institute will be a leading supplier of knowledge relating to the sustainable management of the resources in our marine ecosystems and the whole food chain from the sea to the table.